Resources | Business Roundtable

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    Betsy Andres Stewart
    Senior Director
    bstewart@brt.org

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LeAnne Redick Wilson
Senior Vice President
​lwilson@brt.org

    

What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

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The Regulatory Accountability Act of 2017 would make the U.S. regulatory system more transparent, accountable and effective.

[The] proposed rules will disenfranchise shareholders, increase the costs of contested elections to the detriment of shareholder value, and further shift power and influence to shareholders driven by special interests and largely unregulated proxy advisory firms. As a final matter, as you know, Congress is currently considering legislation that would prevent a universal proxy requirement. We believe it is in the best interests of shareholders and corporate governance in the United States that the SEC wait for Congressional action on the matter before implementing its final rule on the subject.

BRT urges New York State Department of Financial Services to revise its proposed rule on Cybersecurity Requirements for Financial Services Companies to adopt a more risk-based approach and avoid overlapping national requirements and guidance.

Business Roundtable sent the following letter to leaders of 28 European Union member states, calling on the EU to overturn the European Commission's order that Ireland recover €13 billion from Apple for alleged illegal state aid.

America’s business leaders have consistently called upon Congress and the Administration to adopt smarter, more effective approaches to financial services regulation that target systemic economic risks without limiting business creativity and innovation.

September 13, 2016

Business Roundtable believes passage of your legislation can play a key role toward addressing this mismatch by supporting state and local efforts to build talent pipelines that provide students and workers the skills they need to succeed in today’s workforce.

September 12, 2016

With every passing day, businesses from the United States are missing out on new business opportunities overseas, to the detriment of local economies and American jobs. Congress can and must act swiftly.

Currently, federal financial aid does too little to support students who are older, returning to school, or seeking specific skills and credentials for work. These students, who may be employing strategies such as combining work and learning, accelerating their time to degree, and/or attending school part-time and year-round, need this flexibility to more successfully persist and complete their program of study.

Reinstating year-round Pell would provide that flexibility, allowing students to receive Pell throughout the entire academic year. Adopting this policy would more formally recognize that the needs of today’s low- income students are inadequately served by the current Pell Grant program.

We respectfully request that the Administration change its policies on background ozone to better assist states as implementation of the 2015 standard moves forward.

Our members believe that informative, clear and usable disclosures are essential to thriving capital markets and place a high value on modernizing and improving disclosures in a manner that continues to provide material information to investors. We agree that a “step-back” look aimed at improving our disclosure regime is appropriate. We are concerned that immaterial line-item disclosures and duplicative disclosure requirements both burden companies and do not provide investors with information necessary to make informed decisions.

We are concerned that the proposed rule, in its current form, is overly prescriptive, could create additional tax compliance difficulties for the individuals and institutions to which it applies, and would make U.S. financial institutions less globally competitive. The proposed rule will also make it difficult for the institutions that pump capital through the U.S. and global economies to attract top talent. In addition, the proposed rule will create burdensome record keeping and corporate governance requirements.

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