Contact

  • General Inquiries
    202.872.1260
    info@brt.org
  • Mailing Address
    300 New Jersey Avenue, NW
    Suite 800
    Washington, D.C. 20001
  • Media Contact
    Amanda DeBard
    Director
    adebard@brt.org

Membership Contact
LeAnne Redick Wilson
Senior Vice President
​lwilson@brt.org

    

What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

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The SEC's announcement has already and will continue to significantly affect board deliberations at companies that intended to seek exclusion of stockholder proposals because the board had planned to submit a company proposal on the same topic.

To reach America’s full potential and create greater opportunity for all Americans, the U.S. economy needs to fire on all cylinders. That level of performance requires pro-growth policies that facilitate business investment, which drives productivity gains, accelerates economic growth and promotes job creation.

Business Roundtable President John Engler testified today before the Senate Finance Committee hearing, "Jobs and a Healthy Economy."

We are writing to express opposition to using Title II of the 1934 Communications Act as the principal basis for FCC action to maintain an open Internet .

The Business Coalition for Transatlantic Trade (BCTT) is a coalition of major American and European companies and associations with significant equities in the transatlantic economy. BCTT seeks to promote growth, jobs and competitiveness through an ambitious, comprehensive and high-standard trade and investment agreement between the United States and the European Union.

Passage of TPA will help ensure that U.S. trade negotiators get the best possible outcomes for American companies, farmers and workers and will reassure our trading partners that Congress and the Administration are committed to reaching strong trade agreements.

U.S. trade continues to expand, and with it, U.S. employment. Today, nearly 40 million U.S. jobs depend on trade. This means that more than one in every five U.S. jobs is linked to exports and imports of goods and services.

Federal regulation has a profound effect on U.S. businesses. Business Roundtable CEOs recognize that some regulations are essential and help ensure that the products we consume are safe; the environment in which we live is adequately protected; and the marketplaces in which our businesses operate are fair, open and competitive. However, regulations also impose significant costs on both businesses and consumers and can reduce employment and depress growth. It is therefore imperative that federal agencies carefully consider the positive and negative impacts of proposed rules.

The Business Roundtable fourth quarter 2014 CEO Economic Outlook Index ‒ which provides a picture of the future direction of the U.S. economy based upon CEOs’ plans for sales, capital spending and hiring ‒ declined moderately from the third quarter, with capital spending declining the most.

CEOs were also asked to identify the two most significant factors holding back increased U.S. investment spending. In response, CEOs said that U.S. tax policy and regulatory issues are limiting U.S. investment spending.

Business Roundtable President John Engler's oral testimony at the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing regarding "FAA Reauthorization: Issues in Modernizing and Operating the Nation’s Airspace."

November 15, 2014

As America’s economy climbs back from the deepest recession in more than half a century, it faces a new challenge: Businesses cannot find enough employees with the right knowledge, skills and training to fill critical jobs. This “skills gap” is a major reason the U.S. economy has not reached its full potential predicted before the recession.1 Moreover, the problem likely will persist unless significant policy changes occur.

I am writing on behalf of the Business Roundtable to express my strong disappointment with the efforts of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to take actions against large employers who are complying with the requirements of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

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