International Engagement | Page 3 | Business Roundtable

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Senior Vice President
​lwilson@brt.org

    

What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

More Than Leaders. Leadership.

Business Roundtable is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote a thriving economy and expanded opportunity for all Americans through sound public policy.

About BRT

It is in the national interest and imperative for the President, Congress and private sector to work together on economic initiatives that support stronger U.S. economic growth, create more economic opportunity and well-paying jobs for Americans and boost the competitiveness of U.S. companies and workers. To promote these goals, we need to move forward forcefully with a pro-growth economic agenda that includes a range of domestic initiatives and a proactive and constructive U.S. trade agenda.

That U.S. trade agenda should include supporting the rules-based international trading system and U.S. trade agreements that have shaped it, modernizing existing agreements and negotiating new high-standard agreements and strongly enforcing U.S. trade laws and agreements. Such an agenda should broadly aim to expand U.S. trade opportunities – exports and imports of goods and services – and address unfair foreign trade and investment practices and unfair imports, not narrowly focus on U.S. trade deficits. This document lays out key principles for U.S. leadership in achieving these objectives.

Business Roundtable Statement on ITC TPP Report

Business Roundtable is urging Congress and the Administration to intensify their efforts to address outstanding industry issues and enact the TPP this year to seize this key opportunity to support U.S. growth and jobs.

Facts on Trade & the TPP

Trade and U.S. trade agreements have a proven record of promoting U.S. economic growth and jobs. Exports accounted for one-third of U.S. economic growth between 2009 and 2014, and trade supported 41 million American jobs in 2014. Given that more than 95 percent of the world’s population and 80 percent of its purchasing power lies abroad, U.S. trade agreements help U.S. companies, farmers and workers sell their goods and services to those customers. In 2014, U.S.

Engler: A New President Wanting Growth Will Turn to Trade Agreements

Business Roundtable President John Engler appeared on CNBC this morning to talk about the importance of expanded trade, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership, arguing that economic realities will encourage candidates skeptical of trade to embrace it once elected.

In a second segment, he and CNBC's Larry Kudlow discussed China's trade violations and the need for strong enforcement measures.

CEO Survey: Pressing for Passage of Trans-Pacific Partnership

A majority of Business Roundtable CEOs responding to the Q1 CEO Economic Outlook Survey reported that passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership would have a positive effect on their ability to “grow my company and become more globally competitive” and to “expand U.S. operations.”  In a media briefing Tuesday, Business Roundtable Chairman Doug Oberhelman of Caterpillar said passage in Congress was definitely doable, even with all the campaign rhetoric critical of trade agreements.

CEO Survey Shows Economy Stuck on Slow, TPP Would Boost Growth

U.S. GDP will grow just 2.2 percent in 2016, according to results of Business Roundtable's Q1 CEO 2016 Economic Outlook Survey released today, dropping from last quarter's projection of 2.4 percent.

What is the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) will cut foreign tariffs, reduce red tape and create enforceable rules that will put U.S. businesses, farmers and workers on a level playing field with foreign competitors. The TPP opens the door for increased U.S. exports, higher-paying U.S. jobs and a stronger U.S. economy. Congress should take action to implement this agreement so American businesses, farmers and workers can start realizing the benefits of the TPP as soon as possible.

Business Leaders Welcome Signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Trade Agreement

We welcome the signing of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement, which presents a tremendous opportunity for American workers, farmers and businesses – and for the entire U.S. economy,

Business Roundtable: 15.6 Million American Jobs Depend on Trade with Trans-Pacific Partnership Countries

Business Roundtable released compelling new national and state-level data on the benefits of trade between the United States and the 11 other countries - Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, japan, Malaysia, Mexico New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam - that are party to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement. Here are some data highlights:

Trade with Trans-Pacific Partnership Countries Supported 15.6 Million American Jobs

BRT released the most up-to-date national and state-level data on the benefits of trade between the United States and the 11 countries that are party to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement.

Trade & American Jobs: 2016 Update

The Impact of Trade on U.S. & State Level Employment

Executive Summary

Pages

Committee Priorities

Trade is a Pillar of Economic Policy: U.S. Economic Growth and Jobs Depend on Domestic and International Policy Initiatives

The Administration, Congress and private sector need to collaborate on a range of domestic economic policy initiatives. These include modernizing the tax system, taking a smarter approach to regulation, investing in infrastructure and helping Americans develop new skills throughout their lifetime.

We also need to recognize that the U.S. economy will not realize its full potential unless the United States does more to create trade opportunities with other countries and attract foreign direct investment to the United States. The U.S. economy and American jobs benefit from both U.S. exports and imports and their central role in global and regional supply chains, which also lower costs for U.S. consumers. Expanded trade will allow U.S. companies and workers to sell more American-made goods and services to the 95 percent of the world’s consumers who live outside the United States. A fully functioning and globally competitive U.S. Export-Import Bank is a vital trade tool for maximizing such U.S. export opportunities and directly and indirectly supporting American jobs at U.S. companies of all sizes.

We Need More Trade Agreements: The United States Needs to Win the Race for Exports and Jobs

The United States needs a winning trade agreement negotiating strategy because our foreign economic competitors are not standing still. Such a strategy should rely on negotiating trade agreements – bilateral, regional, plurilateral and multilateral – that will maximize U.S. leverage and ensure the United States actively shapes the international trading system so U.S. companies and workers are not disadvantaged.

There are now more than 270 bilateral and regional trade agreements between countries worldwide, and the United States is a party to only 14 of those agreements. These U.S. free trade agreements (FTAs) have greatly benefited the U.S. economy and American jobs by increasing U.S. exports and creating strong, enforceable rules for U.S. trade and investment with those countries. For example, while they include only six percent of the population outside the United States, the 20 U.S. FTA partner countries purchased nearly half of all U.S. goods exports worldwide in 2015. In that same year, the United States had a nearly $8 billion surplus in goods and services trade with FTA partner countries. This compares to a $509 billion U.S. deficit in goods and services trade with non-FTA countries. In the United States, U.S. trade and the trade agreements that help enable it support nearly 41 million U.S. manufacturing, services and other trade-related jobs – more than one in five.

Our foreign competitors are using their own FTA negotiations to advance their own national interests and gain competitive advantages over U.S. companies and workers by: (1) opening foreign markets and creating export opportunities on preferential terms for their companies and workers; (2) creating and supporting higher-paying domestic jobs tied to trade for their workers; (3) writing “free and fair” trade rules on their terms; and (4) advancing their foreign policy and national security goals.

Here are a few examples of other countries’ FTA efforts around the globe. The European Union (EU) has completed FTAs with Singapore, Vietnam and Canada. The EU is also negotiating FTAs with Japan, India, Indonesia, Mercosur (Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay), the Philippines, Australia and New Zealand and modernizing its existing FTA with Mexico. China is negotiating the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership with 15 countries, including seven of the 11 Trans-Pacific Partnership countries, and a trilateral FTA with Japan and South Korea. Moreover, Mexico, which is the second- largest U.S. goods export market, has a network of FTAs with 44 countries.

High Standard is the Only Standard: The United States Must Negotiate High-Standard and Modern Trade Agreements

New U.S. trade agreements and existing U.S. trade agreements that need to be updated should achieve high standards, build on the rules-based international trading system and effectively address emerging economic and technological developments. They should ensure free and fair trade by breaking down foreign tariff and non-tariff barriers and addressing unfair foreign trade and investment practices and unfair imports.

Existing U.S. trade agreements should be periodically reviewed to see if they should be strengthened and modernized to address any trade issues and challenges that have emerged since they were negotiated. Examples of newer trade issues and challenges include: (1) promoting e-commerce and digital trade in goods and services, including the elimination of foreign barriers, for all sectors, to the free flow of data and requirements to store data locally; (2) ensuring market access for new types of services; (3) strengthening intellectual property rights; (4) eliminating foreign localization policies and domestic content requirements for goods and services; (5) ensuring fair competition with foreign state-owned and controlled enterprises; (6) simplifying and harmonizing rules of origin across U.S. trade agreements; and (7) promoting regulatory cooperation and coherence between the United States and its trading partners.

If trade agreements are not fully and properly implemented, enforced and upgraded over time, they risk delivering less value to American businesses and workers. In updating existing U.S. trade agreements, it is critical to maintain these agreements and build on the many benefits they have created for the United States.

The key objectives for negotiating new U.S. trade agreements and modernizing and strengthening existing U.S. trade agreements are set out in the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (TPA-2015 law). The TPA-2015 law also establishes procedures for: (1) congressional oversight and consultation as well as public input on trade negotiations; and (2) implementation of a completed trade agreement. These requirements ensure that negotiations on U.S. trade agreements are as transparent and informed by Congress and the public as possible.

Enforcement is Essential: The United States Needs an Effective Trade Enforcement Strategy

It is essential to create a level playing field for U.S. companies and workers by stopping unfair foreign trade and investment practices and unfair imports. This should involve strong and effective enforcement of U.S. trade and investment agreements – including World Trade Organization agreements – and U.S. trade laws and trade-related regulations, consistent with U.S. statutory requirements and international trade obligations.

A successful enforcement strategy depends on the United States having strong trade agreements to enforce. This means strengthening and modernizing existing U.S. trade agreements and aggressively pursuing new U.S. trade deals.

Such enforcement efforts provide an important opportunity to hold our trading partners accountable to strong trade rules. These efforts are also critical to opening international markets, halting unfair foreign trade and investment practices and unfair imports and addressing emerging economic and technological developments vital to U.S. innovation and competitiveness across all sectors of the economy.