International Engagement | Business Roundtable

Contact

  • General Inquiries
    202.872.1260
    info@brt.org
  • Mailing Address
    300 New Jersey Avenue, NW
    Suite 800
    Washington, D.C. 20001
  • Media Contact
    Betsy Andres Stewart
    Senior Director
    bstewart@brt.org

Membership Contact
LeAnne Redick Wilson
Senior Vice President
​lwilson@brt.org

    

What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

Open markets for international trade and investment are essential for supporting U.S. economic growth and jobs. Business Roundtable supports policies that promote U.S. trade and investment, and create a level playing field for U.S. companies competing in global markets.

Key Stats on Trade

Whether it be in the context of private enterprise or public policy, Business Roundtable CEOs believe that sound decisions must be grounded in the facts.  Our commitment to evidence-based, data-driven decision making is embodied in the Business Roundtable Data Monitors — a suite of executive-style dashboards that illustrate key data points and trends in various areas of public policy.

Business Roundtable Statement on Trade

As business leaders committed to supporting U.S. growth, jobs and expanded trade, we look forward to working with the Administration and Congress to find ways to help American workers and companies compete successfully.

Letter on Ex-Im Bank

With every passing day, businesses from the United States are missing out on new business opportunities overseas, to the detriment of local economies and American jobs. Congress can and must act swiftly.

Business Leaders Welcome Step Forward in TPP Process

The TPP will generate powerful economic opportunities for American exporters, and we are encouraged by progress toward congressional approval of the agreement. We urge Congress and the Administration to continue working together to approve the TPP this year.

Opening & Expanding Markets Through New Trade

The United States and 11 other countries have completed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a modern trade agreement that creates new opportunities for American manufacturing and services businesses large and small to compete in a global economy. The TPP cuts over 18,000 foreign taxes on American-made products, leveling the playing field for U.S. exporters. Congress should approve the TPP this year so U.S. businesses, farmers, and workers can start to reap these benefits. 

Joint Letter on Urgent Passage of TPP

If the TPP is not approved this year, the United States will jeopardize a huge opportunity for U.S. growth, jobs and leadership.

BRT, CMN, Business Council of Canada Joint Letter on North American Leaders Summit

Deeper collaboration among Canada, Mexico, and the United States should focus on improving our international competitiveness, supporting economic growth and jobs in our countries, facilitating the legitimate movement of people, goods, services, capital, and energy between our countries, and addressing emerging challenges such as cybersecurity.

CEO Survey: Economic Signs Make Slight Improvement

Business Roundtable CEOs are becoming slightly more optimistic about their companies' capital investment, sales and hiring over the next six months, according to BRT's Quarterly CEO Economic Outlook Survey for the second quarter of 2016. 

However, the CEOs projection for GDP growth for 2016 ticked down from 2.2 percent to 2.1 percent. 

Business Roundtable Statement on ITC TPP Report

Business Roundtable is urging Congress and the Administration to intensify their efforts to address outstanding industry issues and enact the TPP this year to seize this key opportunity to support U.S. growth and jobs.

Facts on Trade & the TPP

Trade and U.S. trade agreements have a proven record of promoting U.S. economic growth and jobs. Exports accounted for one-third of U.S. economic growth between 2009 and 2014, and trade supported 41 million American jobs in 2014. Given that more than 95 percent of the world’s population and 80 percent of its purchasing power lies abroad, U.S. trade agreements help U.S. companies, farmers and workers sell their goods and services to those customers. In 2014, U.S.

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Committee Priorities

The United States and 11 other countries have completed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a modern trade agreement that creates new opportunities for American manufacturing and services businesses large and small to compete in a global economy. The TPP cuts over 18,000 foreign taxes on American-made products, leveling the playing field for U.S. exporters.

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As business leaders representing every sector of the economy, we know that trade — both exports and imports — and U.S. trade agreements help drive America’s economic growth, competitiveness and job creation. Currently, trade supports more than one in five American jobs. Exports account for nearly 14 percent of overall U.S. GDP, and since 2004, U.S. exports have grown faster than GDP.

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Competing in the Global Marketplace

Business Roundtable supports policies that help U.S. companies and workers increase their competitiveness in the global marketplace and ensure that U.S. and foreign markets remain open for trade and investment. 

With over 95 percent of the world’s population and 80 percent of the world’s purchasing power outside of the United States, Business Roundtable supports: (1) Actively pursuing strategic bilateral and regional negotiations, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP); (2) Actively pursuing plurilateral negotiations like the Trade in Services Agreement and an expanded WTO Information Technology Agreement; and (3) Vigorously enforcing U.S. rights under existing and future agreements.

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Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) is a critical tool for advancing the U.S. trade agreements to support U.S. economic growth and jobs.

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Emerging Growth Markets

Tapping into the world’s emerging markets – like China and India – is one of the keys to U.S. economic growth and job creation. Business Roundtable encourages constructive engagement by: (1) targeting the elimination of market access barriers and discriminatory treatment of U.S. exporters and investments; and (2) enforcing U.S. rights under international trade and investment rules to ensure that U.S. companies and workers are not disadvantaged by discriminatory foreign government policies.

Promoting Trade

Business Roundtable supports: (1) reauthorizing the U.S. Export-Import Bank to help U.S. companies compete for sales abroad and support the U.S. jobs that depend on those sales; (2) continuing to implement reforms to outdated U.S. export controls; and (3) increasing international regulatory cooperation through initiatives such as the TPP and TTIP negotiations and the high-level U.S. regulatory working groups with Canada and Mexico.