Resources | Page 8 | Business Roundtable

Contact

  • General Inquiries
    202.872.1260
    info@brt.org
  • Mailing Address
    300 New Jersey Avenue, NW
    Suite 800
    Washington, D.C. 20001
  • Media Contact
    Rayna Valenti
    Director, Communications
    rvalenti@brt.org

Membership Contact
LeAnne Redick Wilson
Senior Vice President
​lwilson@brt.org

    

What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

More Than Leaders. Leadership.

Business Roundtable is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote a thriving economy and expanded opportunity for all Americans through sound public policy.

About BRT

Explore Resources byor

With the spread of information and telecommunications technologies across the economy, the daily operations and long-term value of most economic enterprises in America now depend on the capabilities and security of their information systems. Moreover, the capacities and security of these systems have become critical elements of U.S. technological and economic leadership. As strategic economic assets, these systems must be protected. The government has a prominent role to play in this security realm.

America needs an energy policy that ensures access to low-cost, sustainable sources of energy and power, which is key to GDP growth and job creation. Affordable and reliable energy sources can protect the environment while increasing energy and economic security, which in turn will enhance national security. This is the bedrock of a growing and competitive economy.

Vibrant and open markets for international trade and investment are a necessary prerequisite for generating new economic growth and job creation opportunities for U.S. businesses and workers.

The U.S. corporate tax system has failed to keep pace with the changing global economy. The U.S. system is an outlier at a time when capital is more mobile and the world’s economies are more interconnected than ever before. Modern, streamlined and fiscally responsible tax policies contribute to a competitive business environment that attracts new investment and supports strong economic growth and job creation.

A nation’s regulatory system is one of the most telling indicators of its business environment. On the one hand, smart regulations that clarify the “rules of the road” and are in line with broad societal values over multiple election cycles can provide an environment of stability, inspire business confidence and accelerate investment. On the other hand, regulations that create uncertainty and reflect shortsighted political interests can impose unproductive cost burdens on businesses and consumers, undermine confidence, and delay investment. The key distinction, therefore, is not the quantity of regulations but the effectiveness and efficiency of regulations as well as the balance between their costs and intended benefits.

Long-term fiscal health is a tangible indicator of effective governance and an essential aspect of an attractive business environment. Nations that manage their fiscal and monetary affairs responsibly are rewarded by the marketplace with low borrowing costs and strong currencies. Conversely, a growing and unsustainable debt burden can undermine confidence, increase business uncertainty, disrupt financial markets and increase government borrowing costs. If not addressed, large debt burdens will have painful economic consequences, including high unemployment, chronically weak consumer confidence and a slowdown in investment.

Long-term fiscal health is a tangible indicator of effective governance and an essential aspect of an attractive business environment. Nations that manage their fiscal and monetary affairs responsibly are rewarded by the marketplace with low borrowing costs and strong currencies. Conversely, a growing and unsustainable debt burden can undermine confidence, increase business uncertainty, disrupt financial markets and increase government borrowing costs. If not addressed, large debt burdens will have painful economic consequences, including high unemployment, chronically weak consumer confidence and a slowdown in investment.

In 2011, U.S. companies faced the second highest statutory tax rate among the 34 members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The U.S. rate was 39.2%, including federal and state income taxes, according to the OECD. With the scheduled reduction in Japan's corporate tax rate taking effect on April 1, 2012, the combined statutory rate in the United States will now be the highest among the OECD countries.

America used to have one of the lowest corporate tax rates in the world but, as other industrialized nations have lowered corporate taxes, in 2011 the U.S. combined corporate rate of 39.2% was the second highest among OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, 13 percentage points higher than the OECD average.

The Administration proposes to fundamentally rewrite the basic rules of international taxation that have been in existence for nearly 100 years in a manner that would severely disadvantage American companies and make U.S. workers less secure. The proposals would increase taxes by over $100 billion on American companies over 10 years.

The United Kingdom and Japan recently reformed their international tax systems to provide a permanent tax exemption for most foreign earnings of U.K. and Japanese companies. Now 26 of 34 OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries employ a “territorial” tax system that does not tax the worldwide earnings of their global companies.

As many of the world’s major economies take steps to enhance the ability of their companies to grow and spur economic growth and job creation, proposed new U.S. international tax policies threaten to unfairly harm American companies and make U.S. workers less secure.

Pages