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  • General Inquiries
    202.872.1260
    info@brt.org
  • Mailing Address
    300 New Jersey Avenue, NW
    Suite 800
    Washington, D.C. 20001
  • Media Contact
    Betsy Andres Stewart
    Vice President
    bstewart@brt.org

Membership Contact
LeAnne Redick Wilson
Senior Vice President
​lwilson@brt.org

    

What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

More Than Leaders. Leadership.

Business Roundtable is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote a thriving economy and expanded opportunity for all Americans through sound public policy.

About BRT

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The United States has the highest statutory corporate income tax rate among developed nations and is the only developed country with both a high statutory corporate income tax rate and a worldwide system of taxation. These features of the US corporate income tax have disadvantaged US businesses in the global market for cross-border M&A.

Business Roundtable CEOs, who lead companies operating in every sector of the economy, recognize that moving data across national borders is essential to economic growth, innovation and improving the quality of the life of people around the world.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), first passed in 1965 and most recently reauthorized in 2001 under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), is the primary federal legislative funding source for U.S. K-12 public education. It is intended to address discrepancies in funding and academic outcomes between advantaged and disadvantaged students.

Ozone is a major component of smog. Ozone is not a pollutant emitted into the air; rather, it is the product of chemical reactions among nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4).

To reach America’s full potential and create greater opportunity for all Americans, the U.S. economy needs to fire on all cylinders. That level of performance requires pro-growth policies that facilitate business investment, which drives productivity gains, accelerates economic growth and promotes job creation.

U.S. trade continues to expand, and with it, U.S. employment. Today, nearly 40 million U.S. jobs depend on trade. This means that more than one in every five U.S. jobs is linked to exports and imports of goods and services.

Federal regulation has a profound effect on U.S. businesses. Business Roundtable CEOs recognize that some regulations are essential and help ensure that the products we consume are safe; the environment in which we live is adequately protected; and the marketplaces in which our businesses operate are fair, open and competitive. However, regulations also impose significant costs on both businesses and consumers and can reduce employment and depress growth. It is therefore imperative that federal agencies carefully consider the positive and negative impacts of proposed rules.

November 15, 2014

As America’s economy climbs back from the deepest recession in more than half a century, it faces a new challenge: Businesses cannot find enough employees with the right knowledge, skills and training to fill critical jobs. This “skills gap” is a major reason the U.S. economy has not reached its full potential predicted before the recession.1 Moreover, the problem likely will persist unless significant policy changes occur.

Next to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, employers are the largest purchasing block of health care in the world.
Creative interplay between employers and government has accelerated many innovations, including quality measurement, Medicare Advantage, transparency and payment reform.

When it comes to the benefits provided to employees and their families, employers want better health, better care and better value.
Dow is focused on optimizing the health of its employees and their families, human performance and long-term value.

Congress, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and the national securities markets recently adopted reforms to strengthen shareholder-director communications and enhance related disclosures. The business community strongly supports these reforms, and corporations have explored new ways to implement them. To assist in this effort, Business Roundtable has developed five guidelines to serve as best practices for shareholder-director communications.

September 18, 2014

Business leaders have a new resource to take full advantage of the recent passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. The report, “Putting WIOA to Work: An Action Plan,” lays out how CEOs can make best use of the law’s emphasis on business involvement. In other education news, BRT released a computer application that will help CEOs make the case for the Common Core State Standards. The app, Biz4Readiness, for iTunes at the iTunes store and for Android at GoogleApps.

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