Immigration | Page 2 | Business Roundtable

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What is Business Roundtable

Business Roundtable (BRT) is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote sound public policy and a thriving U.S. economy.

More Than Leaders. Leadership.

Business Roundtable is an association of chief executive officers of leading U.S. companies working to promote a thriving economy and expanded opportunity for all Americans through sound public policy.

About BRT

As business leaders representing every sector of the economy, Business Roundtable members understand the importance of fixing America’s broken immigration system. Immigration reform, done right, will help keep America secure and is essential for a healthier economy – accelerating growth, encouraging hiring and creating American jobs.

Searching for the High-Skilled Worker

This morning the Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on high-skilled immigration reform.  The hearing is expected to focus on individual instances of abuse or gaming of the system, but the principal problem is far larger: the artificial limits on visas for high-skilled workers currently set in law are woefully inadequate to meet the needs of our economy.

Business Roundtable Statement on President’s FY 2016 Budget Proposal

Washington – BRT President John Engler made the following statement today on President Obama’s fiscal year 2016 budget request to Congress: "America’s business leaders encourage the Administration to work with congressional leaders to find common ground on pro-growth tax policies."

Business Groups Comment on USCIS Notice of Request for Information

The undersigned associations, representing small and large businesses from all sectors of the economy across the country, have significant interest in ensuring the U.S. immigration system functions in a manner that allows for maximization of growth and innovation.

CEO Survey: An Economy Growing Well Below Its Potential

Business Roundtable today released its Fourth Quarter CEO Economic Outlook Survey, with results showing declining expectations for capital spending and sales over the next sixth months. Hiring, the CEOs projected, will tick up slightly. 

For all of 2015, GDP is expected to grow at 2.4 percent, the same growth rate as this year. 

AS BRT Chairman Randall Stephenson, Chairman and CEO of AT&T, said in briefing reporters, the economy continues to expand, but "at a rate well below its potential, especially when you compare it to previous recoveries.”

Americans Tell Congress: “Get Immigration Reform Done”

Americans across the country on Wednesday called on Congress to fix America’s broken immigration system during a National Day of Action on Immigration Reform.

Business Speaks Out in 'Day of Action' on Immigration Reform

Business Roundtable on Wednesday joined other major trade associations -- including more than 60 groups across the country -- to call on Congress to fix the broken U.S. immigration system this year. The events (tweeted at #actonimmigration) featured release of a new national survey that documented widespread public support for immigration reform. News coverage and commentary follows ...

More Than Two Dozen New State Polls and New National Poll Show Broad and Crosscutting Support for Congress to Pass Immigration Reform This Year

At least 84% of voters in each survey believe the immigration system is in need of fixing, and nearly 3 in 4 voters – and 2 in 3 Republican voters – reject the argument made by many in Congress that they should not act until the Administration enforces existing laws.

Bottom Line: CEOs Press for Immigration Reform

Business leaders understand that immigration reform is an urgent economic issue and are calling for congressional action.

An Immigrant CEO on Immigration: Why Reform Makes Sense

Outstanding op-ed in Crain's Chicago Business by Stephen M. Chipman, CEO of Grant Thornton LLP, on the economic benefits of immigration reform. Chipman writes from the perspective of a native of England who emigrated to the United States on an H-1B visa, became a U.S. citizen and then spent spent two years in China as leading Grant Thornton's operations there.

Immigration Reform: The Time is Now

The George W. Bush Institute in Dallas hosted a panel discussion on immigration Tuesday, bringing together leaders from business, politics and religion, directing their arguments toward Texas conservaties who question the wisdom of reform. Introducing the panel was Randall L. Stephenson, Chairman and CEO of AT&T and Chairman of Business Roundtable.

From Dallas Business Journal, "AT&T CEO Stephenson: 'What are we waiting for?' on immigration reform":

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Committee Priorities

With 11 million undocumented immigrants, the United States must do a better job of enforcing immigration law. Business Roundtable supports:

  • Eliminating the magnet of illegal employment through mandatory compliance with the 
current electronic employment verification system under a single nationwide standard.
  • Pursuing more effective strategies to secure American borders and ports of entry, such 
as mandating additional physical and surveillance resources to meet ongoing security 
needs.
  • Providing for consistent and effective enforcement of immigration laws across the 
country.
Read More
Welcoming Legal Immigrant Workers to Contribute to America

America has a long history of welcoming immigrants who through their own drive and hard work contribute to our society and economy. Business Roundtable supports:

  • Increasing the number of H-1B visas and exempting from the annual cap H-1B 
workers who have degrees in needed fields from universities in the United States.
  • Allowing individuals with advanced STEM degrees (science, technology, engineering 
and math) from universities in the United States to qualify immediately for a green card 
to work and live in the United States.
  • Establishing a manageable legal system for workers who may not have higher 
education but are needed for specific sectors, including agriculture, hospitality and 
construction.
Finding a Solution for Undocumented Immigrants

It is unrealistic to expect people who have set down roots to leave voluntarily, and large- scale deportation would disrupt the workforce, harm the economy and cost billions of dollars. Business Roundtable supports:

  • Allowing undocumented immigrants already residing in the United States to come forward, pay a penalty and undergo a series of requirements to earn legal status, including a security screening and learning English.
  • Enabling individuals who entered the United States as minors and who have been educated in U.S. schools to obtain green cards, subject to appropriate screening and restrictions.
  • Facilitating the integration of immigrants into American society through incentives and programs designed to encourage the learning of English and U.S. history and civics.